How to use group settings for persuading and rallying people

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Being in a group creates an intense feeling to belong. At the end of the day, we’re all social animals that want to belong to a group or crowd. This instinct makes us vulnerable to being persuaded by individuals that know how to influence groups and crowds. Politicians play on this human instinct a lot. 

In a group setting, they begin by warming up the crowd, talking about ideas and values that everyone shares, creating a pleasant feeling of agreement. They rely on vague but loaded words full of emotive qualities such as justice or truth or patriotism. They talk of abstract, noble goals, like making a country great again, rather than the solving of specific problems with concrete action.

People lose their reasoning power when they’re in a group setting, as mentioned above, they will have an intense desire to fit in. Let’s take a look at a fictional character called Jim that demonstrates how exactly to use this. Jim is an excellent student that wants to attend an Ivy League college. In order to improve his college resume, he runs for student council president. 

During his speech, he starts off by talking about things every student agrees on. He mentions how homework annoys everyone and how school work is overwhelming; things students can relate to and agree with. After doing so, he talks about how it’s time to establish justice and make the school a better place, an environment where students are happy and satisfied. While stating all of this, he adds emotions to his words and makes sure his speech is dramatic. Consequently, Jim won the election in this fictional school. 

While this is an oversimplified example, you probably get the idea. Use this strategy the next time you want to rally people for something or persuade large amounts of people. 

Lesson: 
  • How to persuade people in crowds 

In a group setting, begin by warming up the crowd, talk about ideas and values that everyone shares, creating a pleasant feeling of agreement. Use vague but loaded words full of emotive qualities such as justice or truth or patriotism. Talk about abstract, noble goals, like making a country great again, rather than solving specific problems with concrete action.

Book: The Laws of Human Nature by Robert Greene 

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